MJF – Multi Jet Fusion

HP has its own 3D printing process called Multi Jet Fusion (MJF). In MJF, fine polymer powder particles (typically nylon) are binder jetted. Next, an IR heat source is used to sinter the material to bind it furthermore. When detailed prototypes and end-use low-volume production are desired, MJF can be a good choice as it can produce functional plastic parts with isotropic mechanical properties suitable for high-detailed prototypes.”
MJF 3D printing
Join our newsletter
4 days

Minimum lead time

Medium

Price range

100μm

Layer Height

0.5

Wall Thickness

Tolerances

± 0.3% with a lower limit on ± 0.3 (0.012'')

Max. part size

380 x 285 x 380 (14.9'' x 11.2'' x 14.9'')

Pros

One of the edges of MJF is that it has high production speed, and though it costs lower than other 3D printing techonologies, it still produces high-quality prints.
Another benefit of MJF is that you can choose from a variety of materials such as PA11 which is used for ductile and quality parts, PA12 which is used for strong and low-cost parts, and PA12 40% glass bead-filled which is good for stiff and low-cost quality parts.

Cons

MJF produce fair surface quality but unlike those that are produced by SLA which are smooth, parts that are produced by MJF have rough surface.
Since the raw parts are grey, they can be easily dyed black. However, it requires extra cost when dyeing it in other colors because it requires coating.
Another disadvantage of MJF is that it has only limited materials.

Applications of FDM

Just like SLS, HP's Multi Jet Fusion (MJF) can be utilized for both the production of functional plastic parts in small batch, and also in the production of prototypes.

Did you know?

HP's MJF printing technology makes sure that the previous layer of a part is still molten before printing a new layer of a new material. In this way, both layers will completely fuse together making sturdy, strong, detailed and functional 3D printed parts with excellent quality.

Ready to get started?

feedback? questions? feature suggestions?

We'd love to hear your thoughts